How to Handle Code Complexity

How to Handle Code Complexity in a Software Company

CODE

Here’s an obvious statement that has some subtle consequences:

Only an individual programmer can resolve code complexity.

That is, resolving code complexity requires the attention of an individual person on that code. They can certainly use appropriate tools to make the task easier, but ultimately it’s the application of human intelligence, attention, and work that simplifies code.

So what? Why does this matter? Well, to be clearer:

Resolving code complexity usually requires detailed work at the level of the individual contributor.

If a manager just says “simplify the code!” and leaves it at that, usually nothing happens, because (a) they’re not being specific enough, (b) they don’t necessarily have the knowledge required about each individual piece of code in order to be that specific, and (c) part of understanding the problem is actually going through the process of solving it, and the manager isn’t the person writing the solution.

The higher a manager’s level in the company, the more true this is. When a CTO, Vice President, or Engineering Director gives an instruction like “improve code quality” but doesn’t get much more specific than that, what tends to happen is that a lot of motion occurs in the company but the codebase doesn’t significantly improve.

It’s very tempting, if you’re a software engineering manager, to propose broad, sweeping solutions to problems that affect large areas. The problem with that approach to code complexity is that the problem is usually composed of many different small projects that require detailed work from individual programmers. So, if you try to handle everything with the same broad solution, that solution won’t fit most of the situations that need to be handled. Your attempt at a broad solution will actually backfire, with software engineers feeling like they did a lot of work but didn’t actually produce a maintainable, simple codebase. (This is a common pattern in software management, and it contributes to the mistaken belief that code complexity is inevitable and nothing can be done about it.)

Sharad Chauhan

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